Is eBay Cracking Down On Fake DT200 Kingston Flash Drives Being Sold On eBay?

Posted on March 16, 2010 by

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A victim who purchased a DT200/128GB Kingston Flash drive from eBay fake flash memory seller beautiful-love365 received this notice from eBay:

eBay Notice Fake Flash Memory Listing Removal

Dear XXXXXX
Please be aware that the following Fixed Price listing:

180473195657 – 128GB USB FLASH DRIVE USB 2.0 PEN STICK MEMORY 128 GB

has been removed by eBay for violating of one or more of our policies. Any offers or bids placed on this Fixed Price listing are now null and void. Because the auction was ended, you as a bidder are not required to complete the transaction.

Please review eBay’s Listing Policies and User Agreement at the following locations:

http://pages.ebay.ca/help/sell/policies.html
http://pages.ebay.ca/help/policies/user-agreement.html

We thank you in advance for your cooperation.

Regards,

eBay Trust & Safety

H53916

Unfortunately the victim had already paid for the item, it was enroute.

The DT200 128GB GB Kingston fakes, were being sold for $27.00 US, an impossible price for a genuine Kingston DT200 128GB flash drive.

eBay ended the sellers listings, removed all traces of they were ever sold and sent messages to people in their database recorded as having purchased from beautiful-love365.

SOSFakeFlash has strong views on listing removal by eBay because it removes traces of the fraudulent selling.

However according to SOSFakeFlash, eBay, by sending emails to buyers who purchased from this fraudulent seller, showed a step in a positive direction. TechReporters agree.

This time, eBay did the work of fake flash angels, contacting buyers by email. Warning them not to commit to the purchase and advising they are released from the bidding contract. eBay does not specify why the listing(s) ended with any detail, to be expected. They can not directly inform buyers they bid and bought a Kingston Counterfeit DT200/128GB fake. They are in a difficult position.

Still, eBay has demonstrated positive action in this case. While the email advisement did not spare the victim who reported in to SOSFakeFlash, it warned many not to commit to purchase and tipped others off something was going to be wrong with their soon arriving purchase.

If eBay committed a team dedicated to detecting fake flash memory items listed on eBay, the problem would diminish rapidly.

eBay has demonstrated they have the ability to use their databases to reach buyers.

As victims continue to report sellers with disputes and claims at eBay Buyer Protection and PayPal Buyer Protection, eBay should be using this information to warn buyers with email, refund and shut fake flash memory sellers down.

Will they?

It remains to be seen. It would be a step in the right direction. It would help restore consumer confidence in eBay.

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